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Binary Protectors News

Binary Protectors News

DUAL-BAND WIRELESS AC3100 GIGABIT ROUTER

BEST HOME HIGH POWERED ROUTER!

Combining high output power and cutting-edge technology, the Luxul XWR-3100 delivers exceptional data rates and outstanding wireless coverage for a world-class Wi-Fi experience. Not just a wireless router, the XWR-3100 is also capable of controlling two additional wireless access points for seamless client roaming.

World-Class Wireless

With leading-edge 802.11ac 4x4 Dual-Band technology, the XWR-3100 delivers data rates up to 3100Mbps. The XWR-3100 isn't just about faster speeds, though. Beamforming, which directs signals from the AP toward each client, focuses the data transmission so that more data reaches each targeted device instead of radiating in all directions equally.

The bottom line is outstanding wireless coverage and network performance.

Seamless Roaming

For installations where an additional wireless access point may be necessary, the XWR-3100 offers a simple, reliable and cost-effective solution. Designed specifically for integrators, the XWR-3100 provides simple and time-saving wireless network setup, while solving client roaming issues using Luxul’s exclusive Roam Assist™, technology previously found only in the XWC-1000 Wireless Controller.

Capable of easily managing up to two additional access points, the XWR-3100 offers a simple, reliable and cost-effective multi-access-point solution for many residential and small commercial networks.

Empowered Networking

The XWR-3100 offers everything you’d expect in a full-featured high-performance router including guest networking and VPN remote access, but it doesn’t stop there. New enhanced capabilities are already in development, including easy-to-use parental controls and powerful remote management. These capabilities will make networks safer, more capable and more reliable, while offering recurring revenue opportunities for installers.

With seamless roaming, installation simplicity, sensible pricing and a growing list of features, the XWR-3100 meets the needs of the professional integrator and helps installers satisfy their clients’ ever-increasing demands for better networks. With Luxul, integrators are now able to offer customers a world-class empowered Wi-Fi network more cost-effectively than ever before.

Features:

  • 802.11ac Wi-Fi (data transfers up to 3100Mbps)
  • Easily Expands Wi-Fi Network with up to 2 Additional APs
  • Seamless Roaming with Luxul Roam Assist™
  • 4x4 MU-MIMO (Wave 2)
  • High Power for Extended Signal Range
  • Concurrent Dual-Band Wireless AC
  • 2.4 and 5GHz Beamforming
  • Quality of Service (QoS)
  • VPN Remote Access
  • Secure Guest Networking
  • Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN)
  • Network Security and Firewall
  • 1 WAN and 4 LAN Gigabit Ports
  • USB 3.0 Port
  • Three Year Limited Warranty

 

This is the best home router without SECURITY.  Period.

Alex Athineos
Managment

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Apps Allow ANYONE to Create Ransomeware!  They are EASY TO USE!  BEWARE!

"Ransomware" threat is on the rise, and cyber criminals are making millions of dollars by victimizing as many people as they can—with WannaCryNotPetya and LeakerLocker being the ransomware threats that made headlines recently.

What's BAD? Hacker even started selling ransomware-as-a-service (RaaS) kits in an attempt to spread this creepy threat more easily, so that even a non-tech user can create their own ransomware and distribute the threat to a wider audience.

The WORSE—You could see a massive increase in the number of ransomware campaigns during the next several months—thanks to new Android apps available for anyone to download that let them quickly and easily create Android ransomware with their own devices.

Security researchers at Antivirus firm Symantec have spotted some Android apps available on hacking forums and through advertisements on a social networking messaging service popular in China, which let any wannabe hacker download and use Trojan Development Kits (TDKs).

How to Create Your Own Android Ransomware


With an easy-to-use interface, these apps are no different from any other Android app apart from the fact that it allows users to create their custom mobile malware with little to no programming knowledge.

To create customized ransomware, users can download one such app (for an obvious reason we are not sharing the links), install and open it, where it offers to choose from the following options, which are displayed on the app's on-screen form:

The message that is to be shown on the locked screen of the infected device

  • The key to be used to unlock that infected device
  • The icon to be used by their malware
  • Custom mathematical operations to randomize the code
  • Type of animation to be displayed on the infected device


Once all of the information has been filled in, users just require hitting the "Create" button.

If the user hasn't before, the app will prompt him/her to subscribe to the service before proceeding. The app allows the user to start an online chat with its developer where he/she can arrange a one-time payment.

fter the payment has been made, the "malware is created and stored in the external storage in ready-to-ship condition," and then the user can continue with the process, making as many as victims as the user can.

"Anyone unlucky enough to be tricked into installing the malware will end up with a locked device held to ransom," Symantec researchers say. 
"The malware created using this automation process follows the typical Lockdroid behavior of locking the device’s screen with a SYSTEM_ALERT_WINDOW and displaying a text field for the victim to enter the unlock code."

The Lockdroid ransomware has the ability to lock the infected device, change the device PIN, and delete all of its user data through a factory reset, and even prevent the user from uninstalling the malware.

Such apps allow anyone interested in hacking and criminal activities to develop a ready-to-use piece of ransomware malware just by using their smartphones without any need to write a single line of code.

"However, these apps are not just useful for aspiring and inexperienced cyber criminals as even hardened malware authors could find these easy-to-use kits an efficient alternative to putting the work in themselves," the researchers say.

So, get ready to expect an increase in mobile ransomware variants in coming months.

Peace Of Mind Isn’t Priceless.

Alex Athineos,
Managment

 

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Flaw in Modern Cars Allows Hackers to Disable Safety Features!

Today, many automobiles companies are offering vehicles that run on the mostly drive-by-wire system, which means a majority of car's functions—from instrument cluster to steering, brakes, and accelerator—are electronically controlled.

No doubt these auto-control systems make your driving experience much better, but at the same time, they also increase the risk of getting hacked.

Car Hacking is a hot topic, though it is not new for security researchers who hack cars. A few of them have already demonstrated how to hijack a car remotely, how to disable car's crucial functions like airbags, and even how to remotely steal cars.

Now, security researchers have discovered a new hacking trick that can allow attackers to disable airbags and other safety systems of the connected cars, affecting a large number of vendors and vehicle models.

Peace Of Mind Isn’t Priceless.

Alex Athineos,
Management

Tagged in: Flaw In Modern Cars
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Dynamic DNS And Your Home Camera System.  IMPORTANT NOTICE!

Dynamic DNS is used for homeowners with changing IP addresses.  Dynamic DNS keeps a host name such as XXX.XX.com as your own and uses your changing home IP address.  Home Surveillance cameras use this to broadcast incoming connections with the homeowner from any device.  Each homeowner uses their Dynamic DNS rather than their IP address.  Its easier and it never changes.

There is an inherit Internet Security problem with this.  Since your Dynamic DNS doesn't change, your much more susceptible to Internet Attacks.  A hacker can now use this never changing address to do illicit things to your network.  Furthermore if the provider of the Dynamic DNS gets hacked all of those addresses it provides is now in the Hackers possession.  Most people who have Dynamic DNS also have Cameras for the specific reason of remote monitoring.

Binary Protectors understands this.  Instead of just installing cameras, we also use the highest quality Dynamic DNS and then protect the home network using the most secure systems available today.

Peace Of Mind Isn’t Priceless.

Alex Athienos,
Management

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3 CIA Developed Hacking Tools For MacOS And Linux

WikiLeaks has just published a new set of classified documents linked to another CIA project, dubbed 'Imperial,' which reveals details of at least three CIA-developed hacking tools and implants designed to target computers running Apple Mac OS X and different flavours of Linux operating systems.

If you are a regular reader of THN, you must be aware that this latest revelation by the whistleblower organisation is the part of an ongoing CIA-Vault 7 leaks, marking it as the 18th batch in the series.

If you are unaware of the Vault 7 leaks, you can head on to the second of this article for having a brief look on all the leaks at once.

Achilles — Tool to Backdoor Mac OS X Disk Images


Dubbed Achilles, the hacking tool allows CIA operators to combine malicious Trojan applications with a legitimate Mac OS app into a disk image installer (.DMG) file.

The binding tool, the shell script is written in Bash, gives the CIA operators "one or more desired operator specified executables" for a one-time execution.

As soon as an unsuspecting user downloads an infected disk image on his/her Apple computer, opens and installs the software, the malicious executables would also run in the background.

Afterwards, all the traces of the Achilles tool would be "removed securely" from the downloaded application so that the file would "exactly resemble" the original legitimate app, un-trojaned application, making it hard for the investigators and antivirus software to detect the initial infection vector.

Achilles v1.0, developed in 2011, was only tested on Mac OS X 10.6, which is Apple's Snow Leopard operating system that the company launched in 2009.

SeaPea — Stealthy Rootkit For Mac OS X Systems


The second hacking tool, called SeaPea, is a Mac OS X Rootkit that gives CIA operators stealth and tool launching capabilities by hiding important files, processes and socket connections from the users, allowing them to access Macs without victims knowledge.

Developed in 2011, the Mac OS X Rootkit works on computers running then-latest Mac OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard) Operating System (32- or 64-bit Kernel Compatible) and Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion) Operating System.

The rootkit requires root access to be installed on a target Mac computer and cannot be removed unless the startup disk is reformatted or the infected Mac is upgraded to the next version of the operating system.

Aeris — An Automated Implant For Linux Systems


The third CIA hacking tool, dubbed Aeris, is an automated implant written in C programming language that is specifically designed to backdoor portable Linux-based Operating Systems, including Debian, CentOS, Red Hat — along with FreeBSD and Solaris.

Aeris is a builder that CIA operators can use to generate customised impacts, depending upon their covert operation.

Previous Vault 7 CIA Leaks


Last week, WikiLeaks revealed about CIA contractor Raytheon Blackbird Technologies, which analysed in-the-wild advanced malware and hacking techniques and submitted at least five reports to the agency for help develop their own malware.

Since March, the whistle-blowing group has published 18 batches of "Vault 7" series, which includes the latest and last week leaks, along with the following batches:

  • Highrise Project — the alleged CIA project that allowed the spying agency to stealthy collect and forwarded stolen data from compromised smartphones to its server through SMS messages.
  • BothanSpy and Gyrfalcon — two alleged CIA implants that allowed the spying agency to intercept and exfiltrate SSH credentials from targeted Windows and Linux operating systems using different attack vectors.
  • OutlawCountry – An alleged CIA project that allowed it to hack and remotely spy on computers running the Linux operating systems.
  • ELSA – the alleged CIA malware that tracks geo-location of targeted PCs and laptops running the Microsoft Windows operating system.
  • Brutal Kangaroo – A tool suite for Microsoft Windows used by the agency to targets closed networks or air-gapped computers within an organization or enterprise without requiring any direct access.
  • Cherry Blossom – An agency's framework, basically a remotely controllable firmware-based implant, used for monitoring the Internet activity of the targeted systems by exploiting vulnerabilities in Wi-Fi devices.
  • Pandemic – A CIA's project that allowed the agency to turn Windows file servers into covert attack machines that can silently infect other computers of interest inside a targeted network.
  • Athena – A CIA's spyware framework that has been designed to take full control over the infected Windows PCs remotely, and works against every version of Microsoft's Windows operating systems, from Windows XP to Windows 10.
  • AfterMidnight and Assassin – Two alleged CIA malware frameworks for the Microsoft Windows platform that has been designed to monitor and report back actions on the infected remote host computer and execute malicious actions.
  • Archimedes – Man-in-the-middle (MitM) attack tool allegedly created by the CIA to target computers inside a Local Area Network (LAN).
  • Scribbles – A piece of software reportedly designed to embed 'web beacons' into confidential documents, allowing the agency to track insiders and whistleblowers.
  • Grasshopper – Framework which allowed the spying agency to easily create custom malware for breaking into Microsoft's Windows and bypassing antivirus protection.
  • Marble – Source code of a secret anti-forensic framework, basically an obfuscator or a packer used by the CIA to hide the actual source of its malware.
  • Dark Matter – Hacking exploits the agency designed to target iPhones and Macs.
  • Weeping Angel – Spying tool used by the agency to infiltrate smart TV's, transforming them into covert microphones.
  • Year Zero – Alleged CIA hacking exploits for popular hardware and software.

Peace Of Mind Isn’t Priceless.

WiKiLeaks
Alex Athineos,
Management

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